Conservation

Foxfield Preserve is a conservation burial ground operated by The Wilderness Center (TWC). It was the first natural burial cemetery in the nation to be operated by a non-profit conservation organization. Foxfield Preserve’s burials go far beyond a simple green burial.  Here, burial can also be a conservation tool, serving to facilitate the restoration and protection of natural areas.

Foxfield Preserve was farmland a decade ago, but since the 43 acre site was acquired by TWC it has been undergoing ecological restoration. Conservation professionals are working to restore 15 acres of native prairie grasses and wildflowers. Reforestation efforts have begun on the remaining areas. Therefore families who purchase here must limit any plantings on their plots to those native varieties included on our approved species list. 

In 25 years, we will have a young forest with plenty of small trees and herbaceous ground cover. In 80 years we will have a mature forest and in 200 years we will have a truly unique and diverse area with rolling meadows and towering trees. Families should understand that restoration is a long-term project with long-term goals, and changes are seen in decades, not months. We are working to ensure that these natural spaces will be protected and preserved for future generations to enjoy.

However, that does not negate the enjoyment of today’s generations. Right now the Foxfield Preserve is providing wildlife habitat, a clean watershed, and cleaner air. The beauty of Foxfield provides a peaceful retreat for families to find solace in quiet reflection. The trails through the Preserve are part of the public walking trails around TWC, allowing the community to also enjoy this space.

Beyond the contribution to land conservation efforts, Foxfield also supports the educational mission of TWC. Proceeds from each sale at the Preserve benefit TWC, funding a multitude of free educational activities. It is not enough to preserve land today, we must also prepare the next generation to care for our Earth.